Assignment 2 Feedback

Tutor feedback for Assignment 2 – ‘Collecting‘ below:

EYV2_Perry_Tatman

I am glad that my tutor thinks that this project has potential. There are potentially 3 or 4 threads I could expand on or distil from the images that I have taken to create a more meaningful body of work. As my tutor advises this may involve another station shoot to nail it.

She point to my difficulty with completing some exercises. I do find is hard sometimes to ‘marry up thought with deed‘ with regard to the given exercises. The problem children in this part of the unit involved people images, and my wife wasn’t willing to be my stooge! However these exercises are not forgotten and will be completed by the end of EYV.

I have tried to make it to OCA Study Visits and also some visits of my own. I still need to write up a couple of these up. I have also been going to the Thames Valley group meetings, and found them to be very inspiring and motivating.

My tutor is also right in that I should keep notebooks for ideas and potential projects. My handwriting is awful, but I will try and make a better effort to keep visual notes; doodles, drawings, mind maps, lists etc. These I can then scan or take pictures of to add to my Learning Log, along with some more reflective content as to how I feel and develop as I progress.

She was also kind enough to provided me with a very comprehensive reading list to help me further this project:

  • Many Are Called by Walker Evans
  • Compression Tokyo by Michael Wolf
  • Subway Commuters by Bruce Dickinson
  • Simon Terrill is an artist interested in crowd theory
  • Priests by Giacomelli
  • Non-Place by Marc Auge

I need to progress with Part three, but I will try my best to review and improve this project towards a more conclusive end. My camera club has its annual exhibition in May and I intend to submit a Theme Print Panel based on this project.

 

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V&A Visit – 24th August 2016

As well as going to the Science Museum on the 24th August I visited the V&A Museum (just across the road) to see what they had to offer by way of current photography exhibits. On enquiring at the information desk I was pleased to find that there were a couple of photographic displays;

  • The Camera Exposed – Gallery 38a
  • A History of Photography: The Body – Gallery 100

Both were also free, which was a bonus.


The Camera Exposed

This temporary (23 July 2016 – 5 March 2017) display was a collection of 120 images from a broad spectrum of photographers, with each image containing a camera in one form another. There was no restriction on photography so I took some pictures of the images that particularly drew my attention. These are shown below, with their accompanying display information:

abelardo-morell-infoabelardo-morell

andreas-feininger-infoandreas-feininger

calum-colvin-infocalum-colvin

don-mccullin-infodon-mccullin

elsbeth-juda-infoelsbeth-juda

henri-cartier-bresson-infohenri-cartier-bresson

john-a-walker-infojohn-a-walker

john-french-infojohn-french

judy-dater-infojudy-dater

louise-dahl_wolfe-infolouise-dahl_wolfe

philippe-halsman-infophilippe-halsman

richard-sadler-inforichard-sadler

tim-walker-infotim-walker

timm-rautert-infotimm-rautert

tosh-matsumoto-infotosh-matsumoto

weegee-infoweegee

weegee-2-infoweegee-2

(Victoria and Museum, 2016)

I really enjoyed this display and highly recommended to anyone wanting to see a marvellous display of themed images. The combination of the various photographers inventiveness, creativity and craftsmanship is evident throughout.


A History of Photography: The Body  (Victoria and Museum, 2016) 

This display is held in the V&A permanent gallery and currently concentrates on ‘The Body‘. The gallery introduction is shown below followed by a selection of prints that I liked:

intro

weegee-infoweegee

suzanne-r-dworsky-infosuzanne-r-dworsky

sophie-ristelhueber-infosophie-ristelhueber

rineke-dijkstra-inforineke-dijkstra

josef-koudelka-infojosef-koudelka

john-coplans-infojohn-coplans

herbert-bayerherbert-bayer-info

helmut-newton-infohelmut-newton-1helmut-newton-2

erhard-dorner-infoerhard-dorner

edward-weston-infoedward-weston

carl-fischer-infocarl-fischer

bernard-f-eilers-infobernard-f-eilers

alfred-lys-baldry-infoalfred-lys-baldry

adolphe-bilordeaux-infoadolphe-bilordeaux

(Victoria and Museum, 2016)

Again another very interesting and varied display, and another I would also highly recommend. I am only sorry that my snaps don’t these great images (in both displays) justice.

Reference:

Victoria and Museum, A. (2016) V&A · the camera exposed. Available at: https://www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions/the-camera-exposed (Accessed: 12 September 2016).

Victoria and Museum, A. (2016) What’s on. Available at: https://shop.vam.ac.uk/whatson/index/view/id/2060/event/A-History-of-Photography–The-Body/dt/2016-09-12/free/1 (Accessed: 12 September 2016).

Tom Hunter

Tom Hunter’s “Brick Lane” project has a nostalgic documentary feel attempting to capture a fading way of life. His monochrome almost cyanotype treatment makes it feel older than it is. The colour certainly cools the mood of the image. Examination of the objects and detritus that litter the image show it to be modern. First impressions give the impression that this could be a garage sale or ad-hock market. But closer inspection show the objects to be damaged, broken, discarded or abandoned.

Brick Lane 1

(Tom Hunter, 1980\’s)

The graffiti only enhances the feeling of abandonment. The old man walking through could have probably walked this route all his life. Slowly watching it decay and deteriorate as time goes by. Those who experience change over a long period to time are less likely to be shocked or surprised than those who experience the results of of this long term change for the first time. It is my impression that the old saying “Familiarity breeds contempt” rings true here.

Reference:

Brick Lane (1980\’s) Available at: http://www.tomhunter.org/brick-lane-2/  (Accessed: 17 July 2016).

 

 

Jodie Taylor

Jodie Taylor’s “Memories of Childhood” project attracts me the same way as Gawain Barnard’s “Boredom To Burn” project. Both explore the destructive nature of boredom experienced by the young. Outlets of frustration and anger at changes they experience both physically, mentally and socially. Drives to understand and explore the limits of the boundary’s laid down by school, parents and society in general. Pushing and experiencing the melancholy of resistance and learning to accept or rebel.

Jodie Taylor - Memories of Childhood 1

(Jodie Taylor, 2013)

The need to imprint or make ones mark on you surroundings has been something that has happened since man lived in caves. Who is Mad Mikey? Did he write this or was it someone else making a statement?

Reference:

Photography and Nostalgia (2013) Available at: http://weareoca.com/photography/photography-and-nostalgia/ (Accessed: 17 July 2016).

JH Engström

The JH Engström image I have chosen is one from his series of images titled “Haunts“.

JH Engström - Haunts 2

(JH Engström, no date)

This series contains a variety of images some overtly sexual and I found it hard to determine the narrative. I started to comprehend some kind of link to memories, fantasies, places been and shared experiences. I was drawn to this particular image as its faded appearance suggested the past. A nondescript estate of flats that be anywhere in the world. The bottom half of the images scrubby muddiness suggested transit and much use. While the objects in the centre first appear to be a play area, but on closer examination seem unrelated and out of place.

Reference:

VU, G. (no date) JH Engström series. Available at: http://www.galerievu.com/series.php?id_reportage=60&id_photographe=17 (Accessed: 8 July 2016).

 

Gawain Barnard

The Gawain Barnard image I have chosen is one from his series of images titled “Boredom to Burn“.

(Gawain Barnard, no date)

This project reminded me of the kind of naughtiness that kids get up to when left to their own devices (like on school holidays), when playtime leads to boredom. Memories of my brother and I using a magnifying glass on a hot summer day to burn ants or grass came flooding back. We were never responsible for any large scale damage. The aftermath of a large burn can turn up and reveal all sorts of things hidden or lost in the grass over time. What drew me to this collection was the variety of subjects revealed, and for me in particular this hand saw. This picture for me generates questions such as:

  • Why a saw?
  • Who lost it?
  • When was it lost?
  • Was it looked for?

I find myself attracted to the odd and out of place and hence to this image.

Reference:

Gawain Barnard (no date) Available at: http://gawainbarnard.com/photo_13162026.html#photos_id=7988362 (Accessed: 27 June 2016).