Project 2: Visual Skills – Exercise 1.3(1) & 1.3(2)

Exercise 1.3 (1) Line
Take a number of shots using lines to create a sense of depth. Shooting with a wideangle
lens (zooming out) strengthens a diagonal line by giving it more length within
the frame. The effect is dramatically accentuated if you choose a viewpoint close to
the line.


The images I have taken below demonstrate converging diagonal lines both physical and virtual which give the appearance of depth.

down-to-lynmouth

Image 1: Down To Lynmouth

footbridge-1

Image 2: Footbridge

minehead-station

Image 3: Minehead Train Station

track-down-f22

Image 4: Blackwater Line

west-brompton-cemetery-1

Image 5: Brompton Cemetery 1

west-brompton-cemetery-6

Image 6: Brompton Cemetery 2


Exercise 1.3 (2) Line
Take a number of shots using lines to flatten the pictorial space. To avoid the effects
of perspective, the sensor/film plane should be parallel to the subject and you may
like to try a high viewpoint (i.e. looking down). Modern architecture offers strong
lines and dynamic diagonals, and zooming in can help to create simpler, more
abstract compositions.


The images I have taken below demonstrate parallel lines both physical and virtual which leave the frame, promoting a sense of mystery and dynamism.

equator

Image 7: Equator

no-loitering

Image 8: No Loitering

position-closed

Image 9: Position Closed

sea-posts-phone-wires

Image 10: Sea Posts & Telegraph Lines

snail-shell

Image 11: Snails Pace

tower-bridge-1

Image 12: Tourist Rush


Review your shots from both parts of Exercise 1.3. How do the different lines relate
to the frame? There’s an important difference from the point exercises: a line can
leave the frame. For perpendicular lines this doesn’t seem to disrupt the composition
too much, but for perspective lines the eye travels quickly along the diagonal and
straight out of the picture. It feels uncomfortable because the eye seems to have no
way back into the picture except the point that it started from. So for photographs
containing strong perspective lines or ‘leading lines’, it’s important that they lead
somewhere within the frame.


The use of perpendicular lines provide a sense of depth by drawing the viewer; into the distance and out of the picture in the case of images 3 – 6. Where as image 1 draws the viewer down and image 2 leads the viewer up.

While the perspective lines in images 7 – 12, rush the viewer out of the frame, either horizontally, vertically or diagonally. The eye seeks a way back in trying to make an unconscious connection external to the image back into the frame. Diagonal lines add a sense of action to the image.